Our favourite blue robotic cat from the year 2112 hates to share his Dorayaki, but is only too happy to pull out an invention or two to help his friend Nobita. Created by Hiroshi Fujimoto under the pen name of Fujiko F. Fujio back in 1969, Doraemon hails from the year 2112, where people use 3D printers, brain-wave sensors and dress-up cameras. Wait – sound familiar? That’s because some of Doraemon’s gadgets from “the future” are actually a reality today.

A few of these inventions listed below – Take-copter, Brain-wave Sensor and Small Light – were indeed Doraemon-inspired. Sadly though, the Doko-demo (Anywhere) Door and, Time Cloth and Memory Bread are still not available on the market.

1. 3D Printer (Mecha Maker)

You can make anything with the Mecha Maker, as long as you have a picture of it. Credit: www.filipiknow.net

You can make anything with the Mecha Maker, as long as you have a picture of it. Credit: www.filipiknow.net

Doraemon’s version: Converts drawings into real, life-sized versions. Insert a diagram of something you want into the slit located on the middle portion, and out comes the actual object.

The real thing: Solid imaging, which was invented by Chuck Hull in the 1980s, formed the basis of 3D printing. You create a virtual blueprint of anything you want to create, feed it to the printer, and it will deposit layer upon layer of material to produce the finished product. Depending on the printer, you can choose to use rubber, plastics, paper, polyurethane-like materials, metals and more.

Industrial strength 3D printers can be used to create anatomically accurate skulls for medical studies. Credit: www.pbclinear.com

Industrial strength 3D printers can be used to create anatomically accurate skulls for medical studies. This is obviously a toy. Credit: www.pbclinear.com

2. Jelly Translator

Jelly Translator (Translator konyaku). Credit: doraemon.wikia.com

Jelly Translator (Translator konyaku). Credit: doraemon.wikia.com

Doraemon’s version: Eat this magical konjac jelly and you’ll instantly know how to speak and understand every single language in the universe.

The real thing: Google Translate (did you see this coming?) and WordLens, which is an app that offers real-time, camera-based translations. WordLens has been acquired by Google and is available for free download. Perfect for deciphering street signs in foreign lands.

Wordlens translates text on images in real time. Credit: lifehacker.com

Wordlens translates text on images in real time. Credit: lifehacker.com

3. Dress-up Camera (Kisekae Camera)

Nobita and Doraemon use the Dress Up Camera to play a prank on Giant and Suneo. (Credit: www.filipiknow.net)

Nobita and Doraemon use the Dress Up Camera to play a prank on Giant and Suneo. Credit: www.filipiknow.net

Doraemon’s version: Cut out your coveted outfit from fashion magazines or catalogues, or use ready-made clothes from your paper doll collection. Insert it into the camera and then focus the viewfinder on the person you want to dress up and voilà – instant makeover.

The real thing: OK, so this is the closest thing, and the obvious catch is that you’re really playing with your own clothes. The DressUp app is an idea hatched by an Italian guy who wanted technology to help him pick out an outfit in the morning. You snap a picture of every single outfit you own and arrange them into nifty categories like colour and clothing type. The app helps you match separates according to colour and season. When you’re done, you can share your OOTD on your social media platforms.

 4. Take-copter

Take-copter takes you anywhere. No licence required. Credit: gadgets.boingboing.net

Take-copter takes you anywhere. No licence required. Credit: gadgets.boingboing.net

Doraemon’s version:  “Take-copter” is a malapropism of the words taketombo (Japanese word for bamboo-copter) and helicopter. It can be attached to any body part and you use your mind to determine destination, speed and altitude. Battery-powered.

The real thing: The closest thing is the GEN H4, the world’s smallest helicopter, priced at US$85,000. It has a seat and two stacked rotors on top of each other. A licence is not required to operate this in Japan.

Click on the photo to read the small print. Credit: Hector Garcia

Click on the photo to read the small print. Credit: Hector Garcia

5. Invisibility Cape

Doraemon's Invisibility Cape. Credit: doraemon.wikia.com

Doraemon’s Invisibility Cape. Credit: doraemon.wikia.com

Doraemon’s version: A white cape which renders anything underneath it invisible.

The real thing: A piece of “retro-reflective fabric” that makes the wearer appear invisible by showing the image behind the wearer. The real-time image transmission gives the illusion that the person wearing the coat is see-through. Seoul’s latest skyscraper, Tower Infinity, will blend into its surroundings using similar technology.

An invisibility cloak at a temporary exhibition at Tokyo's Miraikan museum in 2010. Credit: Hector Garcia

An invisibility cloak at a temporary exhibition at Tokyo’s Miraikan museum in 2010. Credit: Hector Garcia

6. Brain-wave sensor (Dream TV)

Easier than psychoanalysis: Doraemon uses Dream TV to infiltrate Nobita's dreams. Credit: gadgets.boingboing.net

Easier than psychoanalysis: Doraemon uses Dream TV to infiltrate Nobita’s dreams. Credit: gadgets.boingboing.net

Doraemon’s version: Doraemon uses it to glimpse into other’s dreams on a screen.

The real thing: The device by Silicon Valley firm, NeuroSky, has a headband that measures brain waves. It can tell how hard the wearer is concentrating and shows the result by showing you the frequency of beta and gamma rays on a screen.

Real brain-wave sensor indicating different wave frequencies in different colours. Credit: Herbert Garcia

Real brain-wave sensor indicating different wave frequencies in different colours. Credit: Herbert Garcia

7. Small light

The Small Light can shrink items. Credit: doraemon.wikia.com

The Small Light can shrink items. Credit: doraemon.wikia.com

Doraemon’s version: A  flashlight, when, beamed at someone, shrinks them to miniature size. Opposite of the Big Light, which enlarges them.

The real thing: A “medical micro robot” developed by Ritsumeikan University in western Japan. Measuring just three centimetres (1.2 inches), Such micro-bots can be used inside patients’ bodies to illuminate their innards and take pictures, administer drugs and collect tissue samples.

If you’re craving a good dose of Doraemon, Nobita And The Space Heroes is now showing in Golden Village theatres.

Sources: www.filipiknow.netwww.kirainet.comwww.independent.co.uklifehacker.comdoraemon.wikia.com