As we recover from being spooked during the Hungry Ghost Festival, and await the ghouls coming this Halloween, let’s have a look at some parks in Singapore where spirits are said to roam. Here are five haunted parks in Singapore to avoid (or to check out… if you like “nightclubs”).

Bidadari Park

The word “Bidadari” is Malay for “fairy” or “angel”. Bidadari Cemetery, one of the oldest cemeteries in Singapore was located along Upper Serangoon Road, near the Woodleigh MRT station. To make way for a future Bidadari housing estate,  the exhumation of the graves began in 2002 and the site was opened as a temporary park space in 2006. It’s a popular spot for joggers and birdwatchers.

Bidadari Park on the former Bidadari cemetery grounds. Photo credit: straitstimes.com

Bidadari Park on the former Bidadari cemetery grounds.
Photo credit: straitstimes.com

With all the misplaced spirits from the Christian, Hindu and Muslim burial grounds that were at Bidadari, I wouldn’t want to be there alone at night! But now, it has been barricaded and awaiting redevelopment.

Bedok Reservoir Park

Bedok Reservoir Park is a huge area with lots of deserted stretches. In 2011, there was a spate of five suicide drownings in the reservoir within a span of just five months.

It is said that Bedok Reservoir Park has bad feng shui (geomancy). According to this diagram from Asia Paranormal, the outline of the reservoir resembles the side view of a male human head.

Map showing the outline of Bedok Reservoir. Photo credit: Asia Paranormal

Map showing the outline of Bedok Reservoir.
Photo credit: Asia Paranormal

The Dragon’s Throat (Adam’s Apple) near the head is said to be the vital essence of the accumulating negative “qi“. According to what is indicated in the picture, there is something sharp pointing at the eyes. If someone uses a sharp object to point at your eyes, you will be blinded. If someone is blinded, there is a high chance that the person will get into an accident. That’s the geomancer’s theory as to why a total of seven bodies have been hauled out from the reservoir.

Labrador Park

Remnants of a former gun outpost at Labrador Park. Photo credit: streetdirectory.com

Remnants of a former gun outpost at Labrador Park.
Photo credit: streetdirectory.com

Labrador Park contains many historical relics from World War II left behind by the British. Although this area did not see much action during the war itself, because the Japanese attacked Singapore from a whole different direction, the Japanese did massacre people in this area. Wandering through this park at night is sure to send chills down your spine.

There are at least nine secret tunnels tucked away beneath Labrador Nature Reserve. These were built in the late 1880s to support the operations of the guns installed above the ground. Previously known as Fort Pasir Panjang, this area was used by the British Army as an artillery battery during World War II. The tunnels were forgotten and only re-discovered in 2001.

Don’t go trying to find the secret tunnels on your own as you need to join an organised, guided group to get in.

Kent Ridge Park

The canopy walk at Kent Ridge Park. Photo credit: thefifthestate.com.au

The canopy walk at Kent Ridge Park.
Photo credit: thefifthestate.com.au

Kent Ridge Park was the location of one of the last battlefields during World War II, and the number of causalities there has made it one of the scariest places in Singapore. Indeed, it was where the fiercest battle between the Japanese soldiers and the Malay Regiment Army took place.

Bukit Chandu, a hill in Kent Ridge Park, was the site of the fierce 48-hour “battle for Pasir Panjang” between the Japanese 18th Division and Charlie Company, a 42-man platoon from the 1st and 2nd Battalion of the Malay Regiment, led by 2nd Lieutenant Adnan Saidi. On February 13, 1942, the Japanese focused their attack on the southern coastal area of Singapore, particularly Pasir Panjang Ridge, battering it with heavy mortar, artillery fire and aerial support.

Fierce fighting ensued, and when ammunition ran short, Adnan and his men resorted to hand-to-hand combat using their bayonets. Heavily outnumbered, the 1st Malay Brigade continued to hold their ground until they were completely overrun. Their lives ended in grisly deaths at Japanese hands. Adnan, the courageous leader, was hung by his legs to a tree and repeatedly bayoneted before his mutilated body was burnt. The only Malay Regiment survivor was Corporal Yaakob, who lived to tell the tale of what had happened to Adnan and the rest.

Today, the fiery spirit of Adnan and his men is remembered by a war memorial plaque in Kent Ridge Park erected in their honour, and the etching on the main memorial column wall of the Kranji War Cemetery No. 385 bearing the words “Lt. Adnan Saidi”.

Kent Ridge Park is beautiful during the day, with its canopy walk and nature trails. But come nightfall, it’s a place fraught with supernatural incidents.

East Coast Park

News article from the Straits Times dated 11 June 1992. Photo credit: ariffin24.wordpress.com

News article from the Straits Times dated 11 June 1992.
Photo credit: ariffin24.wordpress.com

On May 17, 1990, a couple was stabbed by two unknown men while they were chatting on the steps of Amber Beacon (also known as the Yellow Tower) near Carpark C. The guy survived but the girl was found dead when police arrived. Since then, some passers-by claim to have seen a female apparition and heard cries of help coming from the yellow tower.

Have I got your hair standing on its ends yet? To spook yourself out this Halloween, check out the Horrorthon going on at Golden Village from October 23 to 31 (tickets available now). The Horrorthon consists of three of the creepiest horror movies this season – The Visit, Crimson Peak and Goosebumps.

In Crimson Peak, secrets lie waiting behind every door. Photo credit: GV.com.sg

In Crimson Peak, secrets lie waiting behind every door.
Photo credit: GV.com.sg

In Crimson Peak, an aspiring author is torn between love for her childhood friend and the temptation of a mysterious and rich outsider.

She has grown up haunted by the loss of her mother, and now, her father has died in mysterious circumstances. She is trying to escape the ghosts of her past, but is swept away to a house that breathes, bleeds… and remembers.

This trailer for Crimson Peak really whets my appetite for this supernatural gothic horror film set at the dawn of the 20th century. Plus it stars Tom Hiddleston and Jessica Chastain. Can’t wait!

thomas crimson peak

The irresistibly seductive Thomas Sharpe (Hiddleston), at his luxurious family estate.

Another film in this Horrorthon is Goosebumps. Part of the ever popular series of novels, in this year’s Goosebumps film, a teenager Zach Cooper (Dylan Minnette) is upset about moving from a big city to a small town, but he finds a silver lining when he meets the beautiful girl, Hannah (Odeya Rush), living right next door.

Jack Black plays R. L. Stine, the author of the bestselling Goosebumps series. Photo credit: GV.com.sg

Jack Black plays R. L. Stine, the author of the bestselling Goosebumps series.
Photo credit: GV.com.sg

Hannah has a mysterious dad, R. L. Stine (Jack Black), the author of the bestselling Goosebumps series. It turns out that there is a reason why Stine is so strange – the monsters that his books made famous are real! Stine protects his readers by keeping them locked up in their books but Zach unintentionally unleashes the monsters from their manuscripts and they begin to terrorise the town. It’s up to Stine, Zach, and Hannah to get all of them back in the books where they belong.

Check out the Horrorthon of movies –  The Visit, Crimson Peak and Goosebumps at GV cinemas!

Sources: AsiaParanormal- Bedok Reservoir, Wikipedia, Infopedia, www.littledayout.com